• Mark

Practice! We're talkin' bout Practice!

Updated: Feb 16

"I'm not perfect. But I am trying every day to concentrate on being better" - Allen Iverson


I have a story for you about PRACTICE. How many of you are bowlers?



I started bowling when I was 6 or 7 years old. My dad was a bowler, and I figure, as parents are wont to do, he thought it may allow him to bowl if he brought me into the game as well.

For those of you who do not know. (Ten Pin) Bowling is a game where you roll a ball (8.595" diameter) down a 60 foot long alley (wooden lane) at 10 plastic covered wooden pins. A game is 10 frames (chances to knock down all 10 pins). A perfect game is 300 points. Scoring is complicated enough that i am not going to try to explain it. But basically 10 X 30 = 300 points - a perfect game.

When I started bowling I was a small child, without much strength or skill and certainly no knowledge on how to succeed at bowling.


I was in leagues and bowled three games minimum every saturday. That means I rolled a bowling ball anywhere between 30 to 183 times to close out the games. That does not include practice, nor any other games I threw for fun. Generally 2 hours straight of bowling. I bowled in leagues from age 7 to age 13, then I stopped.

During that time, I achieved an average score of around 160 points, and a high score of 222 points. That is barely better than half the goal of 300, with a best that was only 2/3rd of the best a person could do.


Later I joined the high school bowling team, got coaching, improved my equipment, got stronger, and practiced more and more. 2 or 3 times a week for 2 hours each time. I got better. My High school average was around 175. Still not perfect.

Still later in life I joined bowling leagues again and continued to practice, improve my equipment, and learn more about the game until finally, I averaged around 200 with a high score of 287. I still never bowled a perfect game...


Did you figure out where I am going with this?


"What is mastery? At the heart of it, mastery is practice. Mastery is staying on the path." - George Leonard


You may be a prodigy, and pass the exams the first time without any studying. However, that is not likely, and if it was, you probably would not be here at Archizam. Most people know the old adage "Practice makes perfect." Well, I say that is not necessarily true. But....


Practice makes you better. Practice shows you where you can improve.

And consistent practice is important to learning and understanding what it is you are practicing.


I have said it before and I truly believe I will be learning AND PRACTICING my whole life and will never be perfect.


This is the goal of Archizam: to give you relevant practice questions and solid feedback so you can study smarter, remember quicker, and PASS YOUR ARCHITECTURE REGISTRATION EXAMS.


Make YOUR commitment to Practice, and sign up for access to Archizam Practice Exams.


By the way - through all my hours and years of practice, though I have not bowled in over 7 years, I can still pick up a ball and roll a 200+ game. Any ball, any lanes.

I believe that is because I put in the time, and did the work, and truly learned how to do it.


However, there is always more to learn.


I would like to continue my quest for the perfect game. I will have to keep learning - and keep practicing.

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